Category Archives: Street Art

Turning 25 in Buenos Aires

thumb_FullSizeRender_1024.jpgNoooo, not me. My blog. I’ve reached a milestone 25 posts on seebuenosaires.com since I started it five years ago. This post, #26, is really an index of the titles of each of my previous posts. I’ve written them to share my experiences, impressions and photos. Now in 2016 with almost 4,000 reader views I’m still finding new things I want to share. So far I’ve written about — well, go ahead, click, read, enjoy–and come visit to seebuenosaires for yourself!

Holy, holy, holy

On politics in Argentina: Without freedom of speech there is no democracy

Parque de la Memoria

Come along and walk with me if you like what you see: Morning walks in Buenos Aires

Viva Jujuy!

argentina image

La Vida Salteña

In red and white: walking against injustice

Your special Buenos Aires tour: the same and not the same

Carnaval 2014, Montevideo, Uruguay

Visit Buenos Aires in 2014

Buenos Aires and Iguazú Falls

Buenos Aires Street Art Graffitti

From Ice to Fire: Visiting Tierra del Fuego

Visiting Argentina’s glaciers

January, 2013 from my southern home

Museum Afternoons

Visiting Mendoza: Argentina’s wine country

People to meet, places to go, food to eat
Welcoming 2012 in Buenos Aires

November

Cycling in Buenos Aires

Bienvenido a mi querida Buenos Aires

On language, culture and friendship

Tango Energy

See Buenos Aires with me

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under bilingual American guide, Buenos Aires, MALBA, Montevideo, Mothers of the Disappeared, Museums in Buenos Aires, Parque de la Memoria, Plaza de Mayo, Politics, public art murals, Recoleta Cemetery, Religious buildings, Street Art, The disappeared, Travel in Argentina, Ushuaia, Visiting Jujuy, Visiting Mendoza, Visiting Salta the Beautiful, Visiting Uruguay

Come along and walk with me if you like what you see: morning walks in Buenos Aires

One of the joys of escaping Chicago’s winter is that I can take morning walks everyday, January through June (unless it’s already too humid and hot by 10:00am here). Buenos Aires is a very walkable city. I prefer to avoid the busy streets and broken sidewalks wherever possible so I head directly towards greener spots in the Recoleta neighborhood. I’m including this map of the area so you can “follow” my hour-long path if you wish.

my route

my route

I start out on Laprida Street (see yellow burst), head toward French, then over a few blocks on Pacheco de Melo to Austria Street and on to Sanchez de Bustamante. From there I head toward the green along Figueroa Alcorta and Ave. Liberator.

Flower kiosk

Ombú bush

Along the route I pass some lovely flower kiosks, and am never disappointed to see the enormous and beautiful Ombú bushes with their interesting and quite extensive network of roots. A species of evergreen, ombús can grow quite large and provide delightful shaded areas to sit, rest, and contemplate life.

I’ve seen too many “ghost bikes” in Chicago marking spots where cyclists were killed by passing vehicles, and I continue to be surprised by the amount of markers embedded along the streets like these rectangular memorials to some of the 30,000 disappeared during the dirty war. One reads: “Here lived Arcangel “Cacho” Herrera and Hilda Marcia Paz, popular activists detained and disappeared by the state terrorism. Neighborhoods in memory and justice.” Two appear side-by-side, in memory of seven young people from Austria and various provinces in Argentina, who were also disappeared. Memory is alive in this country!IMG_0979

On Agüero Street I pass a park alongside the National Library and pause to snap photos of this “lover’s spot” where couples promise undying love with locks attached to wrought iron window 20150117_121424bars20150117_121511 and am amused by the life-size sculptures of Evita and Juan Peron and their dog seated on a park bench. Only the angle of the morning sun prevents me from taking a selfie alongside them.20150114_105628Continuing my walk along Avenida Libertador, I ascend the steps of the Faculty de Derechos (Law School pictured above) and continue on to the Paseo Ruben Dario and the Plaza Francia near the Buenos Aires Design Mall (with the famous Basilica de Nuestra Senora del Pilar, a 17th century Jesuit church and the 2nd oldest building in the country, in the center background).

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Passing a few runners and others out walking or cycling is a constant, but Saturdays and Sundays bring out many more locals and tourists alike, enjoying the same open green spaces as I do. There is a lot of city to walk, but it’s the greenery that brings me to this “route”. Enjoying this outdoor gallery of murals along Pacheco de Melo Street is definitely a visually exciting way for me to start each day! The quantity and diversity of public art murals along my walk just beg me to photo them. I can’t resist so I hope you’ll enjoy my sharing them with you. Many are 2013 artists’ interpretations of various sites throughout the city. Enjoy viewing them here and plan to come see them in person!

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February 10, 2015 · 7:20 pm

Your special Buenos Aire tour: the same and not the same

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The sites to see in Buenos Aires remain basically the same, but yet each tour I give turns out to be a unique experience for a variety of reasons: time, local special events, and new places to visit, eat, enjoy! Such was definitely the case when Kathy P visited Buenos Aries for 11 days in March. It was Kathy’s first visit to South America,

Shopping. Old San Telmo Market

Shopping. Old San Telmo Market

and to Buenos Aires in particular, so it called for the basic tourist highlights: a bus tour of the city, the Museum of Latin American Art in Buenos Aires (MALBA), the Museo Evita, touring the famous Recoleta Cemetery, a day trip to Tigre, the Delta, another to Colonia del Sacramento in Uruguay and yet another to a unique feria just outside the city, the Feria de Mataderos. We were fortunate, too to attend some very special events: a live Joan Baez concert at Teatro Gran Rex, a tour of Teatro Colon Opera House with time to sit in on an orchestral rehearsal session. And frequently throughout Kathy’s 11 day visit, we enjoyed music, music,

AfroCultural Center drumming workshop

AfroCultural Center drumming workshop

Feria San Telmomusic, tango in the theatre and in the neighborhood.

Tango dancers. Esquina Homero Manzí

Tango dancers. Esquina Homero Manzi

Tango. Esquina Homero Manzi

Tango. Esquina Homero Manzi

The weather: late summer, early fall, with daytime highs in the low to mid 70’s, except for one day with afternoon and overnight rain. Sunny, blue skies with low humidity, a plus for visiting Buenos Aires late summer to early fall.

Having a travel-conscious traveler like Kathy here was wonderful as she continually gave me feedback about those events she thought were “must-do’s” for all my tour guests. Visiting the Feria de Mataderos was one of those.

More dancers near the "bar notable"Bar Oviedo in Mataderos

On Sundays from March through December, there are two adjacent arts and crafts fairs, one in the park of Nueva Chicago (no kidding, that’s really the name of the place) and the other in the Feria de Mataderos itself, where the culture of Northern Argentina shapes the arts and crafts, foods, music, lots of dancing, singing, and a gaucho skill riding “sortija” competition on display. Our lunch consisted of a “choripan” (what we know as a sausage sandwich on good French bread) cooked on the parrilla (barbecue grill), accompanied by your beverage of choice and papas frítas (French fries) for less than $8 per person.

Mataderos dancers 2Another of Kathy’s “musts” was to rent a vehicle to tour Colonia in style. And so we did!

 

 

 

 

 

Our "ride" in Colonia

Our “ride” in Colonia

Though a little noisier than a golf cart, our jeep cost us about $35 for the full day, and was easy to drive around the town, stopping at the now defunct Plaza de Toros (bullfighting ring) for a few photos,

Inside the Plaza de Toros

Inside the Plaza de Toros

My kind of bull

My kind of bull

or at the swanky Sheridan Golf Resort and Hotel at the end of the river road to peek in at the lifestyles of the rich and well, rich, and naturally to use the bathrooms, check out the outrageous prices on their menus and head back to our jeep for the duration. Returning back to the center of this World Heritage town, we walked the plaza in the historic old part of town, enjoyed seeing the fun wares in some local boutique shops, climbed the lighthouse (well almost all the way to the top, I confess!) to see all of the city surrounding us, and stopped for quite a while taking in the newly created public art murals painted on the outside of the soccer stadium wall there

2013 mural series. Colonia

2013 mural series. Colonia

2013 stadium mural. Colonia

2013 stadium mural. Colonia

Political commentary abounds in Buenos Aires including here,

Protesting Monsanto. San Telmo

Protesting Monsanto. San Telmo

on the column of a newly restored historic building in San Telmo where protesters spray painted their message to Monsanto and passers-by like we were one Sunday morning. Two of the more moving political moments we shared during Kathy’s visit took place one afternoon at the Plaza de Mayo. There we witnessed the silent procession of the Mothers and Grandmothers of the Disappeared, who have met and walked here every Thursday afternoon for the past 37 years, beginning as a new form of social protest during the Dirty War (1976-83) and continuing through today. Sharing the plaza that Thursday was an exhibit created by the 9th Conference of Women Bank Workers to protest discrimination against women.

Exhibition protesting discrimination against women

Exhibition protesting discrimination against women

The contrast between the white headscarves of the Madres, chosen to represent the diapers of their babies kidnapped and disappeared by the military dictatorship during the dirty war years,

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo

alongside the pairs of bright red women’s shoes standing in silent contemporary witness against violence to women was moving. These two diverse groups of Argentinian women will take the stage in my next post.
Great weather formed the background for our March touring, and except for one rainy afternoon and evening, we enjoyed sunshine and temperatures from 70-80 degrees, the usual early March fare here. In other words—an ideal time to visit for those north Americans who don’t want summer’s heat but do want to escape the brutal winters in the Midwest and beyond.

Much sightseeing, eating, drinking, listening to music, enjoying the dancers and doing it all inexpensively were definitely the highlights of Kathy’s trip. As was watching the Mothers of the Disappeared present their symbolic white headscarf to Joan Baez at her concert (she was literally moved to tears!), spending a few hours enjoying every piece of the exhibition of the Argentinian painter-mystic Xul Solar

Museo Xul Solar

Museo Xul Solar

just a few blocks away from my apartment, and the art deco and art Nuevo on the streets and in the cafés, well, it’s quite something to experience.

Tango orchestra. Feria de San Telmo

Folkloric music from northern Argentina

 

Come see for yourself. I’m accepting reservations now on a limited basis for my personalized tours of Buenos Aires and beyond in 2015 (January through June). Don’t wait too long to visit the Paris of South America! I’ll show you a good time, no doubt.

What is real is invisible to the eye said the Little Prince.

What is essential is invisible to the eye.  from The Little Prince.  2013 Mural detail. Colonia

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Filed under bilingual American guide, Buenos Aires, Colonia del Sacramento, Feria de Mataderos, MALBA, Museums in Buenos Aires, Street Art, Tigre, Travel in Argentina, Visiting Uruguay

Buenos Aires Street Art Graffiti

I’ve taken to carrying my camera with me whenever I’m outdoors in Buenos Aires so I can take pictures of interesting, creative, and unusual images and experiences. Along my travels I’ve taken photos of lots of graffiti or street art. Two distinctly different types of street art have surfaced in my collection, political and non-political or more decorative works. I’ve come across both types throughout the city, the nearby suburb of Quilmes, and across the Rio de la Plata in Colonia de Sacramento, Uruguay, and in BA’s barrios, including Boedo, San Telmo, La Boca, Barrio Chino, and Parque Patricios. Colorful, abstract and concrete, these include some samples of traditional tagging, along with others where the street artists make the brick walls and doors their (and our) canvases. Scroll over the slideshows to pause, advance or return back to a previous photo.

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The political graffiti reflects local and universal themes of peace not war; celebrating public education; free, legal and safe abortions; the power of the community; demands of justice for the Once train wreck tragedy of February, 2012 in which 51 people died, and “Justice, justice, justice” in the city of Ushuaia at the very southern tip of the south American continent.

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Some street art keeps alive the symbols and memories of the painful dictatorship Argentina suffered during the Dirty War (1973-81) when injustice thrived and the young, the activists, and children were taken from their homes, tortured, traded, or thrown into the river to their death.

One such symbol of the justice seekers is the white head scarves of the Mothers de la Desaparecidos, the Mothers of the Disappeared, who marched and still march each week in silent protest to honor the more than 30, 000 Argentines, young and old, who were murdered by the terrorist state, military-led government.

A moving tile-inlaid square of glass and concrete sculpture along a San Telmo sidewalk keeps live the memory of local activist Guiller Moler, who was disappeared and detained by the military on June 24, 1978. “Neighborhood, memory and justice,” is written.

Children’s rights are everyone’s responsibility.

These stenciled busts of Eva Peron and President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner line the pavement outside the famous Pink House, the Casa Rosada.

Demanding justice for those responsible for the negligence that led to the Feb. 2012 train derailment tragedy at the Once train station, at a march on the 1-yr anniversary of the Once tragedy.

These photos are just the tip of the graffiti iceberg, so to speak. A group of street artists and activists who are a part of graffitimundo.com (graffiti world) have been creating and showcasing various examples of murals and street art they’ve found all over the city. Committed to documenting the origins of the graffiti and street art scenes in Buenos Aires, they are in the process of completing work on a feature length documentary entitled “White Walls Say Nothing”. They also offer bike tours of BA street art, indoor exhibitions in pop-up spaces in London, Washington, DC. Having learned about them just as I was leaving Buenos Aires this summer, I have yet to take one of their walking or biking tours, but they will certainly be part of my BA agenda for 2014! Follow my blog to get the latest updates.

Stay tuned for my next post on what your 2-week visit to Buenos Aires might look like. See what four friends and I did during their visit to Argentina in February of 2013!

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Filed under Buenos Aires, Graffiti, Street Art, Travel in Argentina