Category Archives: Museums in Buenos Aires

Turning 25 in Buenos Aires

thumb_FullSizeRender_1024.jpgNoooo, not me. My blog. I’ve reached a milestone 25 posts on seebuenosaires.com since I started it five years ago. This post, #26, is really an index of the titles of each of my previous posts. I’ve written them to share my experiences, impressions and photos. Now in 2016 with almost 4,000 reader views I’m still finding new things I want to share. So far I’ve written about — well, go ahead, click, read, enjoy–and come visit to seebuenosaires for yourself!

Holy, holy, holy

On politics in Argentina: Without freedom of speech there is no democracy

Parque de la Memoria

Come along and walk with me if you like what you see: Morning walks in Buenos Aires

Viva Jujuy!

argentina image

La Vida Salteña

In red and white: walking against injustice

Your special Buenos Aires tour: the same and not the same

Carnaval 2014, Montevideo, Uruguay

Visit Buenos Aires in 2014

Buenos Aires and Iguazú Falls

Buenos Aires Street Art Graffitti

From Ice to Fire: Visiting Tierra del Fuego

Visiting Argentina’s glaciers

January, 2013 from my southern home

Museum Afternoons

Visiting Mendoza: Argentina’s wine country

People to meet, places to go, food to eat
Welcoming 2012 in Buenos Aires

November

Cycling in Buenos Aires

Bienvenido a mi querida Buenos Aires

On language, culture and friendship

Tango Energy

See Buenos Aires with me

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under bilingual American guide, Buenos Aires, MALBA, Montevideo, Mothers of the Disappeared, Museums in Buenos Aires, Parque de la Memoria, Plaza de Mayo, Politics, public art murals, Recoleta Cemetery, Religious buildings, Street Art, The disappeared, Travel in Argentina, Ushuaia, Visiting Jujuy, Visiting Mendoza, Visiting Salta the Beautiful, Visiting Uruguay

Your special Buenos Aire tour: the same and not the same

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The sites to see in Buenos Aires remain basically the same, but yet each tour I give turns out to be a unique experience for a variety of reasons: time, local special events, and new places to visit, eat, enjoy! Such was definitely the case when Kathy P visited Buenos Aries for 11 days in March. It was Kathy’s first visit to South America,

Shopping. Old San Telmo Market

Shopping. Old San Telmo Market

and to Buenos Aires in particular, so it called for the basic tourist highlights: a bus tour of the city, the Museum of Latin American Art in Buenos Aires (MALBA), the Museo Evita, touring the famous Recoleta Cemetery, a day trip to Tigre, the Delta, another to Colonia del Sacramento in Uruguay and yet another to a unique feria just outside the city, the Feria de Mataderos. We were fortunate, too to attend some very special events: a live Joan Baez concert at Teatro Gran Rex, a tour of Teatro Colon Opera House with time to sit in on an orchestral rehearsal session. And frequently throughout Kathy’s 11 day visit, we enjoyed music, music,

AfroCultural Center drumming workshop

AfroCultural Center drumming workshop

Feria San Telmomusic, tango in the theatre and in the neighborhood.

Tango dancers. Esquina Homero Manzí

Tango dancers. Esquina Homero Manzi

Tango. Esquina Homero Manzi

Tango. Esquina Homero Manzi

The weather: late summer, early fall, with daytime highs in the low to mid 70’s, except for one day with afternoon and overnight rain. Sunny, blue skies with low humidity, a plus for visiting Buenos Aires late summer to early fall.

Having a travel-conscious traveler like Kathy here was wonderful as she continually gave me feedback about those events she thought were “must-do’s” for all my tour guests. Visiting the Feria de Mataderos was one of those.

More dancers near the "bar notable"Bar Oviedo in Mataderos

On Sundays from March through December, there are two adjacent arts and crafts fairs, one in the park of Nueva Chicago (no kidding, that’s really the name of the place) and the other in the Feria de Mataderos itself, where the culture of Northern Argentina shapes the arts and crafts, foods, music, lots of dancing, singing, and a gaucho skill riding “sortija” competition on display. Our lunch consisted of a “choripan” (what we know as a sausage sandwich on good French bread) cooked on the parrilla (barbecue grill), accompanied by your beverage of choice and papas frítas (French fries) for less than $8 per person.

Mataderos dancers 2Another of Kathy’s “musts” was to rent a vehicle to tour Colonia in style. And so we did!

 

 

 

 

 

Our "ride" in Colonia

Our “ride” in Colonia

Though a little noisier than a golf cart, our jeep cost us about $35 for the full day, and was easy to drive around the town, stopping at the now defunct Plaza de Toros (bullfighting ring) for a few photos,

Inside the Plaza de Toros

Inside the Plaza de Toros

My kind of bull

My kind of bull

or at the swanky Sheridan Golf Resort and Hotel at the end of the river road to peek in at the lifestyles of the rich and well, rich, and naturally to use the bathrooms, check out the outrageous prices on their menus and head back to our jeep for the duration. Returning back to the center of this World Heritage town, we walked the plaza in the historic old part of town, enjoyed seeing the fun wares in some local boutique shops, climbed the lighthouse (well almost all the way to the top, I confess!) to see all of the city surrounding us, and stopped for quite a while taking in the newly created public art murals painted on the outside of the soccer stadium wall there

2013 mural series. Colonia

2013 mural series. Colonia

2013 stadium mural. Colonia

2013 stadium mural. Colonia

Political commentary abounds in Buenos Aires including here,

Protesting Monsanto. San Telmo

Protesting Monsanto. San Telmo

on the column of a newly restored historic building in San Telmo where protesters spray painted their message to Monsanto and passers-by like we were one Sunday morning. Two of the more moving political moments we shared during Kathy’s visit took place one afternoon at the Plaza de Mayo. There we witnessed the silent procession of the Mothers and Grandmothers of the Disappeared, who have met and walked here every Thursday afternoon for the past 37 years, beginning as a new form of social protest during the Dirty War (1976-83) and continuing through today. Sharing the plaza that Thursday was an exhibit created by the 9th Conference of Women Bank Workers to protest discrimination against women.

Exhibition protesting discrimination against women

Exhibition protesting discrimination against women

The contrast between the white headscarves of the Madres, chosen to represent the diapers of their babies kidnapped and disappeared by the military dictatorship during the dirty war years,

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo

alongside the pairs of bright red women’s shoes standing in silent contemporary witness against violence to women was moving. These two diverse groups of Argentinian women will take the stage in my next post.
Great weather formed the background for our March touring, and except for one rainy afternoon and evening, we enjoyed sunshine and temperatures from 70-80 degrees, the usual early March fare here. In other words—an ideal time to visit for those north Americans who don’t want summer’s heat but do want to escape the brutal winters in the Midwest and beyond.

Much sightseeing, eating, drinking, listening to music, enjoying the dancers and doing it all inexpensively were definitely the highlights of Kathy’s trip. As was watching the Mothers of the Disappeared present their symbolic white headscarf to Joan Baez at her concert (she was literally moved to tears!), spending a few hours enjoying every piece of the exhibition of the Argentinian painter-mystic Xul Solar

Museo Xul Solar

Museo Xul Solar

just a few blocks away from my apartment, and the art deco and art Nuevo on the streets and in the cafés, well, it’s quite something to experience.

Tango orchestra. Feria de San Telmo

Folkloric music from northern Argentina

 

Come see for yourself. I’m accepting reservations now on a limited basis for my personalized tours of Buenos Aires and beyond in 2015 (January through June). Don’t wait too long to visit the Paris of South America! I’ll show you a good time, no doubt.

What is real is invisible to the eye said the Little Prince.

What is essential is invisible to the eye.  from The Little Prince.  2013 Mural detail. Colonia

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Filed under bilingual American guide, Buenos Aires, Colonia del Sacramento, Feria de Mataderos, MALBA, Museums in Buenos Aires, Street Art, Tigre, Travel in Argentina, Visiting Uruguay

Argentina: a visit to Buenos Aires and Iguazú Falls

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Friends north and south at Bar de Cao

Friends north and south at Bar de Cao

What will we do during our two weeks in Buenos Aires? My friends had lots of ideas, and so did I. How to plan a rich 2-week experience of El Sur was my challenge when four dear friends travelled to Buenos Aires and Iguazú Falls, Argentina in February 2013 (summer in BA!). They wanted to see and do all that was possible, so that’s the trip we planned.

Housing, Air Travel Reservations
In advance of the trip, we searched online for suitable housing that met all their criteria (3 bedrooms, internet access, air conditioning, in the Recoleta neighborhood) and I located one that did exactly that—and just a block away from my own apartment there. I recommended a travel agent to them who assisted with their flight arrangements to Buenos Aires as well as a hotel stay and tour for their 2-day side trip north to see Iguazú Falls, a marvelous natural wonderland of 200 waterfalls, good hiking and lush vegetation at the border with Brazil.

Personalized
And for the entire two weeks of their South American vacation we enjoyed Buenos Aires as few tourists usually do. Not only did we visit all the typical tourist sites including excellent museums, outdoor weekend arts and crafts fairs, see a traditional tango show, but we also visited with my growing community of Argentinian friends, enjoying one another at the outdoor weekly tango concert/dance in Parque Patricios, friends’ lovely country house in Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay, where we discussed everything from local foods to film, politics, Argentine history and so much more!

Museums, food, music
In all, we saw exhibits at five museums, including the Museo de Belles Artes (Museum of Fine Arts), MALBA–Museum of Latin American Art in Buenos Aires, the Evita Museum, Museo Casa Carlos Gardel, Fundación Próa, and the newest, the Museo del Bicentenario, around the corner from the Casa Rosada.

While their apartment had a full kitchen, the travelers preferred to sample from Buenos Aires’ many excellent restaurants and to sample lots of local specialty foods. We had the best grilled meat in the city, at the famous parrilla restaurant La Cabrera, enjoyed artisanal ice cream at Freddo’s (more than once), enjoyed empanadas and pizzas at Puntopizza, down the street from their apartment. Also close to “home” they enjoyed great sandwiches and salads at the local restaurants Delicious, Como en Casa, and Nuestros Sabores (wonderful risottos too). We visited the famous Cafe Tortoni and Las Violetas for late day cocktails and appetizers,

snacks, Las Violetas

snacks, Las Violetas

tried the picada meat/cheese/olives-and-more sampler and beers at my favorite, Bar de Cao.

Music in Buenos Aires was high on everyone’s list, and whether unplanned, like the solo bandoneon player who entertained us at El Ateneo Bookstore, and the weekly local tango dancing in Parque Patricios,

Tango, Parque Patricios Tango, Parque Patricios]

or planned, we saw the professional show of tango dancing, singing and music at Piazzolla Tango, the folkloric music of northern Argentina we shared at La Peña del Colorado and lastly the Lopez Ruiz Jazz Quartet at the jazz club Notorius.

Navigating BA
Our group of five travelled by boat,

Seeing the falls close up

Seeing the falls close up

buses, cars, taxis, plans, ferries and miles on foot. We went on guided tours of the Recoleta Cemetery, a city-sponsored bus tour of Buenos Aires, a driving tour of the San Telmo and La Boca neighborhoods, and the most expensive, a wonderful tour of the famous opera house the Teatro Colon. We scoured two weekend outdoor arts ferias in Recoleta and San Telmo. I wasn’t the only guide on the trip, either. I was delighted the evening Larra led us the La Cumaná restaurant, where we had a delicious dinner of food local to northern Argentina.

And more food and wine
Other Argentine gastronomy we had included: artesan ice cream (gelato), máte, medialunas and facturas, lots and lots of delicious Malbec, coffee, local beers, chivito sandwiches and Josefina’s homemade Pia nóno in Uruguay, fresh pastas and excellent risottos. Incredibly good grass fed, hormone-free beef and chorizos, along with cheeses, olives and artesanal breads. What’s not to like?

Ahh!
The trip, like most, presented us with its share of challenges. We thankfully escaped the bus thief who tried to steal Jacqui’s camera, but not the couple who got away with Donna’s purse (camera and $) on the final day of the trip. Kathleen survived her bee sting with a visit to the hospital emergency room, and everyone, me included, learned so much about ourselves as well as the marvelous city of Buenos Aires. Era un gran exito! (It was a great success!)

Join me and enjoy summer or fall in Buenos Aires in 2014!

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Filed under bilingual American guide, Buenos Aires, Museums in Buenos Aires, Travel in Argentina

Museum Afternoons

While I’ve visited Buenos Aires many times during the past 10 years, I’ve yet to see all the museums here. This summer I returned to my favorite ones—MALBA (The Museum of Latin American Art in Buenos Aires), to the Museo de Evita and to the Museo Eduardo de Sivori, all three located in the Palermo neighborhood.  These three have been well described in most of the travel guide books, but some of the newer ones haven’t been widely written about thus far.  Let me introduce you to a few I’d never seen prior to this year.

Come with me to the Cerveceria Munich (Munich Beer House) located in Puerto Madero, the not-to-be-missed historical Museo del Bicentenario, a new museum located just behind the Casa Rosada, the Casa Nacional del Bicentenario in Recoleta and the Museo de la Ciudad in San Telmo.

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Because of these museum visits, along with a private tour my Argentine friend Daniel, an architect, gave me, I have been learning more about the history, architecture, and culture of the city and the country. I learned that the Casa Rosada was once two separate buildings (the presidential palace and the post office—joined together) and the Cabildo, across the Plaza de Mayo from the Pink House, was reduced in size from its full 12-arch length and shortened and slightly relocated for better visual harmony between the Plaza and the Obelisco, a panoramic view revealing the strong Parisian architectural influence at the time.

Some of the museums are noteworthy for the structures themselves, as is the Munich Beer House, while others shine more because of the specific exhibits on display, like the Museo de la Ciudad and the Casa Nacional del Bicentenario.  And the Museo del Bicentenario has it all—an impressive space on the 1580-1855 site of the former Forte de Buenos Aires (located behind the Casa Rosada), as well as its impressive exhibits.

I found the Museo del Bicentenario to be a perfect complement to Daniel’s architectural walking tour.  The museum, opened in May, 2011, celebrates 200 yrs of Argentine history (1810-2010)  in the remains of a the former fort of Buenos Aires and the original Customs House, through a series of audio-visual presentations that take the viewer through various periods in Argentina’s history.  All the video material and descriptions of objects are only available in Spanish, the videos displaying the physical changes in the city over this 200 year period, and video from the Dirty War (1976-83) are well worth a visit to history buffs in any language!  The contrast between the museum space itself and the brick-and-mortar (and cannon guns) remaining from the old fort provide quite the contrast.  A mural by the Mexican artist Siquieros, which had been boxed up for years, is on display.

At the Casa Nacional del Bicentenario, its building constructed in 1913, I saw two exhibits, the permanent “Many Voices, One History: Argentina 1810-2010” and the temporary exhibit “Mercedes Sosa, Un Pueblo en mi voz” (A town in my voice).   “Many voices” is a video installation that takes the viewer through eight stages of the country’s historical, social, political, economic and cultural development through a series of mostly still photos, with quotes, narration and background music.  An interesting exhibit, but not as well constructed and informative for me as were the video clips at the Museo del Bicentenario.

The Mercedes Sosa exhibit showcases the life of this wonderful Argentine folksinger from Tucuman who was known as “La Negra.” A wonderful video with interviews of some of the artists she worked with, along with clips of some of her performances plays repeatedly sending her voice and music through the exhibit room, as you follow a timeline of her life and performance highlights.

Cerveceria Munich was empty the afternoon I visited except for me, two other visitors and a few staff members scattered throughout this former German Beer House along the southern coast of the Rio de la Plata, which operated from 1927 and 1957 as a central gathering place for middle class and well-to-do Porteños.  From its wonderful art deco style and exquisite stained glass windows, sculptured columns, water nymphs statues in the outdoor garden, to the late 19th century ambience inside, Cerveceria Munch is visually fascinating.  Built in 4 months in 1927, the building had the refrigeration capacity to cool and transport three thousand barrels every day via a series of pipes tunneled throughout the building.  A rich photo exhibit of old Quilmes posters added an additional turn-of-the-century flair.  Though alone, I could hear the music of the people and musicians that filled the cerveceria on weekend afternoons.    If only, I thought, if only I could sit down and enjoy a beer here—perhaps after the current restorative efforts have been completed in the coming year.  This definitely is a place I want to come back to again! Currently it houses the administrative office for the city’s museums, but I hope they have plans to re-open the main hall; it’s a marvelous space!

An exhibit of children’s toys from the early 19th century was one of three exhibits currently on display at the Museo de la Ciudad (Museum of the City), in the heart of the San Telmo barrio.  Here I learned that what I knew as an Erector Set was called Meccano in Spanish and it was very popular, too, in Argentina, during the 50’s and 60’s.  Replicas of early tin, wood, and metal toys, bikes, cars, dolls, and games from as far back as 1840, playfully filled the gallery, with early metal sand pails hanging above.  Another gallery showcased doors—wooden, marble, iron, glass—and the third gallery a display of an early Argentine magazine series.  There is no space for a permanent exhibit, so you can be assured you will encounter new objects with every visit!  Lunch with my friend Maria Teresa, at a restaurant on nearby Avenida de Mayo, followed by a quick visit to the Casa de la Cultura’s tienda, housed in an amazing building, rounded out one of my museum afternoons.

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Filed under Buenos Aires, Museums in Buenos Aires, Travel in Argentina