Argentina: a visit to Buenos Aires and Iguazú Falls

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Friends north and south at Bar de Cao

Friends north and south at Bar de Cao

What will we do during our two weeks in Buenos Aires? My friends had lots of ideas, and so did I. How to plan a rich 2-week experience of El Sur was my challenge when four dear friends travelled to Buenos Aires and Iguazú Falls, Argentina in February 2013 (summer in BA!). They wanted to see and do all that was possible, so that’s the trip we planned.

Housing, Air Travel Reservations
In advance of the trip, we searched online for suitable housing that met all their criteria (3 bedrooms, internet access, air conditioning, in the Recoleta neighborhood) and I located one that did exactly that—and just a block away from my own apartment there. I recommended a travel agent to them who assisted with their flight arrangements to Buenos Aires as well as a hotel stay and tour for their 2-day side trip north to see Iguazú Falls, a marvelous natural wonderland of 200 waterfalls, good hiking and lush vegetation at the border with Brazil.

Personalized
And for the entire two weeks of their South American vacation we enjoyed Buenos Aires as few tourists usually do. Not only did we visit all the typical tourist sites including excellent museums, outdoor weekend arts and crafts fairs, see a traditional tango show, but we also visited with my growing community of Argentinian friends, enjoying one another at the outdoor weekly tango concert/dance in Parque Patricios, friends’ lovely country house in Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay, where we discussed everything from local foods to film, politics, Argentine history and so much more!

Museums, food, music
In all, we saw exhibits at five museums, including the Museo de Belles Artes (Museum of Fine Arts), MALBA–Museum of Latin American Art in Buenos Aires, the Evita Museum, Museo Casa Carlos Gardel, Fundación Próa, and the newest, the Museo del Bicentenario, around the corner from the Casa Rosada.

While their apartment had a full kitchen, the travelers preferred to sample from Buenos Aires’ many excellent restaurants and to sample lots of local specialty foods. We had the best grilled meat in the city, at the famous parrilla restaurant La Cabrera, enjoyed artisanal ice cream at Freddo’s (more than once), enjoyed empanadas and pizzas at Puntopizza, down the street from their apartment. Also close to “home” they enjoyed great sandwiches and salads at the local restaurants Delicious, Como en Casa, and Nuestros Sabores (wonderful risottos too). We visited the famous Cafe Tortoni and Las Violetas for late day cocktails and appetizers,

snacks, Las Violetas

snacks, Las Violetas

tried the picada meat/cheese/olives-and-more sampler and beers at my favorite, Bar de Cao.

Music in Buenos Aires was high on everyone’s list, and whether unplanned, like the solo bandoneon player who entertained us at El Ateneo Bookstore, and the weekly local tango dancing in Parque Patricios,

Tango, Parque Patricios Tango, Parque Patricios]

or planned, we saw the professional show of tango dancing, singing and music at Piazzolla Tango, the folkloric music of northern Argentina we shared at La Peña del Colorado and lastly the Lopez Ruiz Jazz Quartet at the jazz club Notorius.

Navigating BA
Our group of five travelled by boat,

Seeing the falls close up

Seeing the falls close up

buses, cars, taxis, plans, ferries and miles on foot. We went on guided tours of the Recoleta Cemetery, a city-sponsored bus tour of Buenos Aires, a driving tour of the San Telmo and La Boca neighborhoods, and the most expensive, a wonderful tour of the famous opera house the Teatro Colon. We scoured two weekend outdoor arts ferias in Recoleta and San Telmo. I wasn’t the only guide on the trip, either. I was delighted the evening Larra led us the La Cumaná restaurant, where we had a delicious dinner of food local to northern Argentina.

And more food and wine
Other Argentine gastronomy we had included: artesan ice cream (gelato), máte, medialunas and facturas, lots and lots of delicious Malbec, coffee, local beers, chivito sandwiches and Josefina’s homemade Pia nóno in Uruguay, fresh pastas and excellent risottos. Incredibly good grass fed, hormone-free beef and chorizos, along with cheeses, olives and artesanal breads. What’s not to like?

Ahh!
The trip, like most, presented us with its share of challenges. We thankfully escaped the bus thief who tried to steal Jacqui’s camera, but not the couple who got away with Donna’s purse (camera and $) on the final day of the trip. Kathleen survived her bee sting with a visit to the hospital emergency room, and everyone, me included, learned so much about ourselves as well as the marvelous city of Buenos Aires. Era un gran exito! (It was a great success!)

Join me and enjoy summer or fall in Buenos Aires in 2014!

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2 Comments

Filed under bilingual American guide, Buenos Aires, Museums in Buenos Aires, Travel in Argentina

2 responses to “Argentina: a visit to Buenos Aires and Iguazú Falls

  1. palosmakamae

    I’m here for the academic year and Iquazu is one of the things I really want to do! Great pictures! It just makes me want to go even more, which I didn’t think was possible.

  2. Pingback: Turning 25 in Buenos Aires | See Buenos Aires

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