From Ice to Fire: Visiting Tierra del Fuego

Afternoon, lagos Tierra del Fuego

Hidden Lake, Tierra del Fuego

You are here. End Rte. 3

It was difficult to leave the spectacular ice of the glaciers in El Calafate. At least I could share my photos with friends, via FB and my blog. But I still looked forward to the next stop on my Patagonian excursion –a trip to Ushuaia, called “El ciudad del fin del mundo” — city at the end of the world.

My travelling companion and I spent three days visiting Ushuaia, cruising the Beagle Channel, touring the Parque Nacional de Tierra del Fuego, with its snow-capped Andes mountains, dense forests, and the confluence of the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans.  Tierra del Fuego got its name (land of fire) from the explorers who first saw the fires of the indigenous Yámana people in the 1800’s.

Beagle Channel

View of Ushuaia from the Beagle Channel

Just north of  Tierra del Fuego (the largest of the islands) is the Strait of Magellan and south of it is the Beagle Channel. We cruised the Beagle Channel one warm, sunny afternoon—atypical weather for this usually windy, cloudy, cold place—stopping to enjoy the sea lions and cormorant birds sharing the Sea Lion Island (Isla de los Lobos).

Sea lions and comorants

Sea lions and comorants

The channel is home to what people mistakenly refer to as the “faro del fin de mundo”(the Lighthouse at the End of the World, made famous by Jules Verne’s novel of the same name), but which is really the Los Eclaireurs Lighthouse.

Les Eclaires Lighthouse, known as the lighthouse at the end of the world

Les Eclaires Lighthouse, known as the lighthouse at the end of the world

Highway Rte. 3, which runs the length of Argentina, ends in the Tierra del Fuego national park, where we hiked one afternoon, after enjoying a delicious lunch of grilled Patagonian lamb (cordero) at a restaurant inside the park.

Grilling lamb

Grilling lamb

Our hotel room overlooked the harbor of Ushuaia,

Sunset, Ushuaia harbot

Sunset, Ushuaia harbor

a block from the main street of the city. The harbor and boats captivated me all day, from sunrise to sunset, on foot or from our dinner table where I ate lots of fresh king crab (centolla) au naturel,

King crab

King crab

in a crabmeat cocktail, or in sushi, or over a bed of spinach in a delicious casserole.I wanted to bring back some living memories of Ushuaia, so I purchased seeds to grow the Lupine flowers  which I found

Lupine flowers

Lupine flowers

near our tour bus one afternoon. I have many wonderful memories of the natural beauty I saw during my time in Patagonia, which my photos couldn’t really capture. Everywhere I went I found signs like this one message to canoeists in Spanish and in English encouraging canoeists and all visitors to protect the environment.  It reads:  “Canoeists, Let us respect life by caring for the environment.  We wish to preserve these surroundings as they are now for future generations.  For this we depend upon your goodwill.  Please respect the paths.”

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4 Comments

Filed under Travel in Argentina, Ushuaia

4 responses to “From Ice to Fire: Visiting Tierra del Fuego

  1. Donna McGrath

    Wow! Makes me want to visit there. Beautiful photos.

  2. Jim Sterne

    Wow–what a place to be hungry! Not to mention the foot of the world. I was expecting treacherous sailing at the end of the world…not such beauty and civilization.

    It is raining hard on a day that seems to have never gotten brighter than at dawn…but all the snow has finally melted in Madtown–even on the ice that still covers the lakes. The 45 Degree warm spell makes many people think that Spring has arrived but I know better–all best, j

  3. Barbara LaSalle

    The best part of sharing this with you DeeDee is that I know you are truly enthralled by what you see–the gift and the giver are interchangeable.
    xo
    Barbara

  4. Pingback: Turning 25 in Buenos Aires | See Buenos Aires

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